New Treatment Theory for KD

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Momcat
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New Treatment Theory for KD

Post by Momcat » Sun Jul 19, 2009 1:54 am


Phattemer
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Re: New Treatment Theory for KD

Post by Phattemer » Fri Jan 18, 2013 5:20 pm

The suggested new treatment therapy in that reference is doxycycline, an antibiotic that has the property of inhibiting metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity. The doxycycline would hopefully reduce damage (elastin breakdown) of the blood vessels by inhibiting the over-active metalloproteinase -9 found in the murine model of KD. However, that treatment isn’t ideal in my opinion. Long term, it could make things worse. Doxycycline would clear bacteria from the intestines and make more room for yeast growth. Yeast create acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde increases the activity of MMP-9. So, in the human body, you could be defeating your purpose with the use of doxycycline. You might increase the activity of MMP-9 by increasing the presence of yeast. (Reference at end of email supports the fact that acetaldehyde increases the activity of MMP-9.)

Possibly a better course of action would be to reduce the amount of acetaldehyde in the body. One could eliminate the yeast, but that isn’t going to happen overnight. Reducing the amount of sugar and carbohydrates in the diet will reduce the amount of acetaldehyde created by intestinal yeast. Yet, a change in diet needs to be gradual or else one may get sick. There is another known way, too. There is an easily made preparation that specifically removes acetaldehyde. This folk remedy has attributes of healing stomach complaints, arthritis and eczema. It can have a side effect of sometimes increasing sensitivity to light. (This remedy has been around for a long time. It was referred to as “sulphurated linseed oil” in Dunglisons, R. Medical Lexicon, A Dictionary of Medical Science, 1866.) I’ve not tried making it myself, yet, so I can’t convey any personal experience at this time. One needs to heat elemental sulfur and flax oil together until it changes color. (Amounts to use are found in a free ebook called Wondro Inside Out.) I’ve just now ordered some Humco Sulfur and flax oil for its creation.

There are many known ways to eliminate yeast growth. The sulphurated linseed oil would help stop the immediate damage to the blood vessels, and also help the body eliminate yeast. Yet this isn't the only course of action that should be undertaken. One should also replace the nutrients that the yeast have depleted in order for the body’s immune system to build back up and be able to control the yeast on its own. There is quite a bit of lore on how to do this on the autism lists.

Toxicol Lett. 2009 Feb 10;184(3):204-10. doi: 10.1016/j.toxlet.2008.11.018. Epub 2008 Dec 6.
Hesperidin inhibited acetaldehyde-induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 gene expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.
Yeh MH, Kao ST, Hung CM, Liu CJ, Lee KH, Yeh CC.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19110045

Phattemer
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Re: New Treatment Theory for KD

Post by Phattemer » Fri Jan 18, 2013 8:39 pm

Here is another indication that acetaldehyde might contribute to the formation of aneurysms. Since alcoholism is associated with aneurysms, they looked at the enzymes in the blood vessels that detox alcohol. Compared to healthy aortic cells, those in an aortic aneurysm had underactive ADH1 enzymes. I've read that this enzyme is inhibited by the presence of acetaldehyde. However, I can't find that reference now. I did find on Wikipedia that the ADH enzymes are grouped into different classes. The class called ADH1 is characterized / defined by it being inhibited by pyrazole and its derrivatives. Pyrazole is formed using an aldehyde. Here is the reference to the lower activity of ADH1 in aneurysms.

The activity of class I, II, III and IV of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in the wall of abdominal aortic aneurysms.
Jelski W, Orywal K, Panek B, Gacko M, Mroczko B, Szmitkowski M. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19332052

I found the following two quotes interesting.

“Class 1 ADH has also been found in blood vessels (Allali-Hassani et al. 1997), a finding relevant to the alcohol-induced flush reaction.”
http://www.whilesciencesleeps.com/pdf/216.pdf

"When high levels of acetaldehyde occur in the blood, facial flushing, light headedness, palpitations, nausea, and general “hangover” symptoms occur. These symptoms are indicative of a disease known as “Asian Flush” or “Oriental Flushing Syndrome”.[6]" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldehyde_dehydrogenase

Phattemer
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aneurysm, yeast, PGE2

Post by Phattemer » Sat Jan 19, 2013 3:18 am

PGE2 is an inflammatory cytokine that is elevated in aortic aneurysms. If you induce an aortic aneurism in an animal and at the same time give it something to reduce PGE2 creation, then the resulting aneurysm isn't as large. Unfortunately, yeast make PGE2. So, if there is an overgrowth of yeast in the body, that probably doesn't help the situation.

Indomethacin inhibits expansion of experimental aortic aneurysms via inhibition of the cox2 isoform of cyclooxygenase.
Miralles M, Wester W, Sicard GA, Thompson R, Reilly JM.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10231640

Phattemer
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Re: New Treatment Theory for KD

Post by Phattemer » Sat Jan 19, 2013 3:22 am

Here is a complete article about using doxycycline for prevention of aneurysms. It says they only have to use a small dose of the doxycycline antibiotic (50 mg). More doesn’t improve the results. This is good news. There would be less chance of the antibiotic hurting the gut flora. (The related antibiotic called tetracycline is notorious for causing yeast overgrowth.)

This is how they think the doxycycline reduces the MMP-9.

“Together, these observations may suggest that the reduction of MMP9 protein can be ascribed mainly to the disappearance of aortic wall neutrophils and that the effects of doxycycline therapy relate to an antiinflammatory effect.”

Circulation. 2009; 119: 2209-2216
Clinical Trial of Doxycycline for Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Inhibition in Patients With an Abdominal Aneurysm -------------
Doxycycline Selectively Depletes Aortic Wall Neutrophils and Cytotoxic T Cells
Jan H.N. Lindeman, MD, PhD;
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/119/16/2209.long

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